Chang, Zee-Fen

ChangZF特聘教授


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EDUCATION AND POSITIONS HELD:

  • 1979 B.S., Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University
  • 1981 M.S., Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University
  • 1986 Ph.D., Department of Biochemistry, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey, U.S.A.
  • 1986-1988 Post-doc, Program of Mol.Biol., Michigan Cancer Foundation, U.S.A.
  • 1988-1996 Associate professor, Department of Biochemistry, Chang Gung University
  • 1996-1997 Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Chang Gung University, Taiwan
  • 1997-2006 Professor, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University
  • 2006-2010 Tenure Distinguished Professor, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University
  • 2010-2011 Deputy Dean, College of Life Sciences, National Yang-Ming University
  • 2011-2015 Director, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, National Yang-Ming University
  • 2010-2016 Distinguished Professor, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, National Yang-Ming University

HONORS:

  • 2014 Distinguished Research Award, Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan
  • 2013 The 57th Academic Award, Education Ministry, Taiwan
  • 2013 Dr. T.-M. Tu Memorial Lectureship, Dr. T.-M. Tu Scholarship Foundation
  • 2004 Outstanding Research Award, National Science Council, Taiwan
  • 2002 Chin-Hsin Medical Award, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University
  • 1999 Outstanding Research Award, National Science Council, Taiwan
  • 1996 Outstanding Research Award, National Science Council, Taiwan

RESEARCH INTERESTS:

The mammalian genomes are comprised of nuclear DNA and hundreds of copies of mitochondrial DNA. In one’s lifetime, DNA lesions in the genome are constantly generated due to endogenous and exogenous exposure to genotoxic chemicals from all sources. Removal of these DNA damages with correct and sufficient nucleotide incorporation is essential for maintaining the genome stability, which has a consequent impact on health and disease. We are interested in how nucleotide regulation is coupled with DNA damage responses to dictate genome integrity and mito-nuclear communication in normal and cancer cells. Our long-termed goal is to develop novel therapeutic and prevention strategies against diseases by manipulating DNA metabolism separately in nuclei and mitochondria through targeting nucleotide enzymes and their regulatory pathways.